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NY rabbi accused of trying to pull over motorists

NY rabbi accused of trying to pull over motorists

The synagogue of Congregation Sulam Yaakov in Larchmont, N.Y., is depicted on Friday, July 12, 2013. The congregation's rabbi, Alfredo Borodowski, is charged with impersonating a police officer by flashing a badge and ordering a fellow motorist to pull over. The New York rabbi, arrested for flashing a badge and ordering a woman driver to pull over, says he was angered by her slow driving. Photo: Associated Press/Jim Fitzgerald

MAMARONECK, N.Y. (AP) — A New York rabbi, arrested for flashing a badge and ordering a woman driver to pull over, says he was angered by her slow driving.

Now other drivers have come forward to allege that the rabbi has been doing the same thing for months. Investigations are under way in three incidents since April.

Rabbi Alfredo Borodowski of White Plains was charged with impersonating a police officer in June. The complaint says he pulled his car alongside a woman’s in Mamaroneck, displayed a silver badge and shouted, “Police! Police! Pull over!”

The rabbi has denied claiming to be an officer. Police say he told them he hates it when people drive too slowly.

His lawyer acknowledges his “manic” behavior but says he’s suffering from bipolar disorder.

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