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Jay Z, Beyonce tried to trademark daughter’s name

Jay Z, Beyonce tried to trademark daughter’s name

WHAT'S IN A NAME: Jay Z and Beyonce wanted to trademark the name of their daughter, Blue Ivy. Photo: Associated Press

Superstars Jay z and Beyonce wanted to trademark their daughter Blue Ivy’s name.

The couple say they were simply trying to protect others from cashing in on her unique moniker.

The “Crazy In Love” hitmaker gave birth to the couple’s first child in January 2012, and the new parents subsequently filed legal papers in a bid to protect the rights to their baby’s name amid rumors they were planning to launch products in their daughter’s honor.

However, their request was rejected after it was discovered that bosses at party planning firm Blue Ivy Events in Boston, Massachusetts had been operating under the title since 2009.

Now Jay Z has opened up about their failed trademark effort in a new cover story for Vanity Fair magazine, insisting they never actually planned to do anything with the copyright.

He says, “People wanted to make products based on our child’s name and you don’t want anybody trying to benefit off your baby’s name. It wasn’t for us to do anything; as you see, we haven’t done anything.”

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