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Alex Rodriguez sues Major League Baseball

Alex Rodriguez sues Major League Baseball

A-ROD LAWSUIT: Alex Rodriguez is suing MLB. Photo: Reuters

NEW YORK (Reuters) – New York Yankees player Alex Rodriguez has sued Major League Baseball and its Commissioner Bud Selig, accusing them of improperly gathering evidence to destroy his reputation and career.

Rodriguez, suspended from 211 games by Major League Baseball for doping, claims MLB interfered with his contracts and business relationships.

The lawsuit, filed on Thursday, seeks unspecified damages.

In August, MLB suspended Rodriguez through the end of the 2014. The Yankee third-baseman was one of 13 players suspended for their alleged links with a Florida clinic accused of supplying players with performance-enhancing drugs.

Rodriguez, 38, has denied wrongdoing and appealed the ruling. A decision is not expected until after the season has ended.

A 14-time All-Star and three-time Most Valuable Player, Rodriguez is the only player challenging his penalty.

The others accepted offers of 50-game bans, but the player known widely as A-Rod received a stiffer punishment because he was accused of other offences, including lying to the investigators.

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