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US Rep Davis: Infrastructure Improvements Needed Now

US Rep Davis: Infrastructure Improvements Needed Now

Photo: Newsradio WTAX

An Illinois congressman is trying to find more money for transportation projects without increasing revenue.

U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis (R-Taylorville) says he wants to spend more on transportation projects, but he’s against raising taxes. He says the answer is cutting spending in other areas, like the $23 billion cut from the farm bill.

“We will be able to then invest more of your tax dollars that are already sent to Washington in roads, in bridges, in rail, in water and in aviation because those are the types of investments that actually put hard-working Americans back to work,” he said.

The 18.4 cents per gallon motor fuel tax the federal government charges is not producing the revenue it once did, as vehicles get more miles per gallon. People are still driving those miles, though, so they need roads built and repaired. Proposals that have been floated include raising the tax rate – it hasn’t gone up since 1993 – or a national sales tax for infrastructure. Davis says he doubts the sales tax idea will happen.

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