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UI Professor Enters GMO Debate

UI Professor Enters GMO Debate

The argument for labeling foods with genetically-engineered ingredients isn’t based on science, according to a University of Illinois professor.

Food science professor Bruce Chassy (pictured) is one of the co-authors of a study released by the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology. It concluded that foods with genetically modified organisms have proven to be safe and don’t need to be labeled, but Chassy doesn’t expect that will convince proponents of labeling.

“People who don’t find what they want in this report will reject it,” Chassy said. “All I can say is that we try as hard as we could to fairly present both sides.”

The report’s conclusions are all on the side against labeling. Chassy admits he’s against it, as well, and feels those arguing for labeling are spreading misinformation.

“A lot of their statements are so blatantly untrue that they must know it, and that makes (them) a liar,” Chassy said.

Illinois is the one of several states that has considered mandatory labeling. Bills were introduced in both House and Senate last year, but never made it out of committee.

 

 

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