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Term Limits Initiative Has Enough Signatures for Ballot Placement

Term Limits Initiative Has Enough Signatures for Ballot Placement

Photo: clipart.com

The term limits campaign is making progress.

The director of the state Board of Elections says it appears, based on sampling, that about 60 percent of the signatures the term limits campaign submitted to get a constitutional amendment on the ballot are valid, which would leave their filing well over the number of signatures needed. The campaign submitted roughly 600,000 signatures, so a 60 percent validity rate would leave 360,000, and the number needed to qualify is about 300,000.

Signatures are disqualified if the person signing is not a registered voter, or if the person is not registered at the address where they say they live.

The announcement today (Monday) pleases Republican governor candidate Bruce Rauner, who is running the effort to get term limits on the ballot.

“They gave the green light to putting term limits on the ballot in November, and this is a major first step in the shakeup process to bring back Illinois,” Rauner said at an availability with reporters today (Monday) in Lisle.

The petitions are still subject to scrutiny by opponents, and there’s a legal challenge pending as to whether the question is one of the legitimate ways to amend the constitution through citizen initiative, so the measure is not certified for the ballot yet.

The proposal would limit state lawmakers to eight years in office, slightly increase the size of the House of Representatives and reduce the size of the Senate, and make it harder for lawmakers to override a veto by the governor.

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