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Rauner Denies Connection to Intimidation by Private Investigators

Rauner Denies Connection to Intimidation by Private Investigators

Photo: Associated Press/Seth Perlman

Bruce Rauner says he had nothing to do with armed investigators coming up to people who signed nominating petitions for the Libertarian Party.

The armed investigators worked for a private security firm hired by a lawyer to challenge those petitions. Those men came up to voters who had signed to get the Libertarians on the ballot, and asked for them to admit the signatures were faked. Rauner says that was done by the state’s Republican Party, not his campaign.

“Well, I’m appalled, I’m appalled by the behavior I’ve read about, and I absolutely reject it and would never condone it,” Rauner said. “It’s terrible. I don’t know if it’s true, but I would never accept it, I’m outraged by what I’ve read.”

The private investigators appear to have been legally armed; whether they broke any voter intimidation laws is unclear.

Despite the petition challenge, the state Board of Election approved the signatures, meaning Libertarian candidates will be on November ballot.

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