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Quinn v Rauner on Minimum Wage

Quinn v Rauner on Minimum Wage

Photo: Newsradio WTAX

Gov. Pat Quinn doesn’t want voters to forget about Bruce Rauner’s old stance on the minimum wage.

Quinn is referring to comments Rauner made during a Republican primary forum in December, when he said he would favor lowering the state’s minimum wage to the federal level, which is $1 lower.

“I’m running against somebody who…got caught red-handed saying we should cut the minimum wage in Illinois. That’s just plain wrong,” Quinn said.

Rauner now says he would not lower the wage, and would support raising it to $10 per hour, but only if the move is coupled with other reforms that he says will help small businesses afford the hike.

“Workers’ comp, tort reform, income tax reduction,” Rauner said.

Rauner says without those reforms, he wouldn’t support raising the wage from its current level of $8.25 per hour. Quinn says there should be “no conditions whatsoever” on raising the minimum wage to $10 an hour, which he says will help businesses.

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