News

“Neighborhood Recovery Initiative” Hits Keep Coming

“Neighborhood Recovery Initiative” Hits Keep Coming

Photo: Newsradio WTAX

Tens of thousands of dollars earmarked for an anti-violence program launched by Gov. Pat Quinn in 2010 was paid to the husband of Cook County Circuit Court Clerk Dorothy Brown.

Benton Cook received $146,401 in salary and fringe benefits from state grant for his work with the Neighborhood Recovery Initiative in the city’s West Garfield Park neighborhood. The neighborhood received $2.1 million over two years from the effort.

He told the newspaper he worked for the program, but didn’t receive that much money for his role.

An audit of the $55 million program released in late February questioned 40 percent of the expenditures claimed by service providers.

The review by Auditor General William Holland found “pervasive deficiencies” and has been sent to law enforcement authorities.

Recent Headlines

in Local

Langfelder to Announce Police Chief Pick Tuesday

Fresh
6-3-15 Springfield Police Chief Forum

Springfield Mayor Jim Langfelder will announce his pick for police chief Tuesday.

in Local

Blood Center Opens New Donor Center

6-29-15 Blood Center

The Central Illinois Community Blood Center is officially in its new home.

in Local

Lincoln College to Become University Again

David Gerlach Lincoln College

The just-installed president of Lincoln College says the college will become a university again.

in Local

Trump Campaigns in Chicago; Stands by Illegal Immigrant Comments

trump_chicago

Donald Trump's speech in Chicago included many defenses on his immigration stance.

in Local

Rauner to State Workers: You Will Get Paid

Illinois Republican gubernatorial candidate businessman Bruce Rauner participates in a Republican gubernatorial candidate debate Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014, in Springfield, Ill. The four Republican gubernatorial candidates said that they’ll be willing to work with unions if elected but differed on how to approach the relationship during a downstate debate that largely focused on pension reform, taxes and just briefly on personal issues that have dogged some of the candidates.

State employees will continue to be paid for working if there's no state budget agreement by Wednesday.