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Marijuana for Kids? In Illinois, It Could Be Possible

Marijuana for Kids? In Illinois, It Could Be Possible

Photo: Newsradio WTAX

It doesn’t sound like much fun to be Chase Gross.

The eight-year-old suffers from a form of epilepsy which has divided his family; he lives with one parent in Colorado, while his other parent lives in Naperville. That’s because Colorado is the only state which allows children to use medical marijuana.

“Chase suffers from 1500 seizures a day,” his mom, Nicole Gross, told senators Tuesday. A committee passed a bill which expands Illinois’ pilot program for marijuana to allow minors with certain seizure disorders to use an oil derived from a cannabis plant.

Another parent, Margaret Storey of Evanston, turns back any thought of the effects which typically come to mind when the subject is pot. “The type currently being given to children in Colorado was originally labeled ‘Hippie’s Disappointment,’” Storey says, “because it is so low in THC – marijuana’s psychoactive component.”

Storey says her ten-year-old daughter is on so many medications, she’s stoned all the time, anyway.

Nobody appeared to speak against the bill.

SB 2636 has passed the Senate Public Health Committee.

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