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Madigan’s Voting Rights Amendment Advances

Madigan’s Voting Rights Amendment Advances

Photo: Newsradio WTAX

House Speaker Michael Madigan’s constitutional amendment to stop voter suppression is advancing in the Illinois Legislature.

A House committee unanimously passed the proposal Tuesday that would change the state constitution to ensure that no one is denied the right to register to vote or cast a ballot based on race, color, ethnicity, sex, sexual orientation or income.

“Eight states have attempted to enact photo ID laws,” he told the committee. “According to the Brennan Center, approximately 25 percent of eligible African-Americans and 16 percent of Hispanics don’t have photo IDs.”

Madigan is also Illinois’ Democratic Party chair. He says he’s concerned that there could be “future efforts” to do so in Illinois.

The measure now heads to the full House. It would be placed on the November general election ballot for voter approval if it receives supermajority support in both houses of the Legislature.

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