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Laws to Help Seniors

Laws to Help Seniors

Three new state laws are designed to help those in long-term care facilities and nursing homes.

Two of the bills deal with identifying problems with those facilities. Complaints about nursing home conditions can now be submitted online, and an ombudsmen program will be expanded to allow better access to seniors living in community-based settings.

State Sen. Heather Steans (D-Chicago) says there have been lots of laws dealing with the state’s nursing homes over the past several years. “You know, every senior deserves to have high quality care. Their family needs to know there’s going to be accountability for that care, and that their loved ones are safe and well cared for,” Steans said.

The third law will create a pilot program allowing certified nursing assistants to administer medication in certain settings while being supervised by a registered nurse.

 

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