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Lavin Lobbying Leads to Revolving Door Questions

Lavin Lobbying Leads to Revolving Door Questions

Photo: Associated Press

A former top aide to Gov. Pat Quinn is now a lobbyist whose clients include a group representing casino owners and a company hoping to get into the medical marijuana business.

Jack Lavin (pictured) started his own lobbying business in February. He left his government job last September. His new venture is being questioned by some because of the state’s “revolving door” ban. That’s meant to prevent top state officials from joining companies that have contracts with state government. Among Quinn’s biggest decisions when Lavin served as chief of staff were expanding gambling and legalizing medical marijuana.

State Sen. Darin LaHood (R-Peoria) says Lavin’s move merits closer scrutiny. But Quinn spokeswoman Brooke Anderson says Lavin consulted an attorney and state ethics officer before leaving.

Lavin’s resume includes a stint as director of the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity in the Blagojevich administration.

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