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Kirk: GOP Will Gain Seats This Year

Kirk: GOP Will Gain Seats This Year

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U.S. Sen. Mark S. Kirk (R-Ill.) is predicting a wave of support for Republicans in this year’s election.

Kirk is confident his party can pick up seats in both houses of Congress, including races in Illinois. He believes Democrats may be hurt by being associated with President Obama.

“In a sixth year of a presidency, you probably don’t want to weld yourself to the president too much,” Kirk said, “because the natural feeling of people when they go to the polling booth (is) to register their displeasure with the administration or the direction of the country.”

That appeared to be the case in the last midterm election during a president’s second term, when Democrats gained control of the House, Senate, and a majority of the governorships and state legislatures in 2006.

The non-presidential party has failed only once since 1822 to gain congressional seats in a midterm election during a president’s second term.

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