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King Would Say There’s Unfinished Business

King Would Say There’s Unfinished Business

The Poor People’s Campaign, founded by the Rev. Martin Luther King in 1967, was resurrected in Chicago in 2003.

The president is Jerry Robinson, who says he’s pulling any lever he can grasp to get politicians and business people to understand how people become poor and what it’ll take to get out of poverty. He says the minimum wage should be increased.

“They wanna raise it to what, $10.10 across the nation? That’s still not enough. It is a start, but it’s still not enough,” he said.

King was waging his Poor People’s Campaign on behalf of garbage collectors in Memphis when he was murdered in 1968. Had King and his original Poor People’s Campaign survived to this day? “If he was here now, he would look and say we still have more work to do. That’s what I believe,” Robinson said.

Robinson notes that while poverty disproportionately affects African-Americans, there are poor people of all races.

 

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