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Illinois Unemployment Rate Dips to 6.8 Percent

Illinois Unemployment Rate Dips to 6.8 Percent

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The state’s unemployment rate is now down to 6.8 percent.

That’s the lowest level since 2008, and 2.4 percent lower than the rate from a year ago — the largest year-over-year drop since 1984.

Gov. Pat Quinn points to those statistics as signs his Republican opponents are wrong about the state’s economic situation.

“There can be cynics out there who are just never happy with anything. They’re the doomsday caucus,” Quinn said. “I don’t think we want to listen to that crowd. They’re the ones who got us into the trouble in the first place in America.”

The monthly employment report says 11,200 private sector jobs were created last month, and more than 35,000 have been added over the past year.

There were roughly 144,000 fewer workers in the state labor force last month than there were in August 2008. Part of that is due to retiring Baby Boomers and part of it’s due to discouraged former workers.

The state’s unemployment rate remains above the national unemployment rate of 6.2 percent.

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