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Illinois Lawmakers Consider Giving 4-Time DUI Offenders Another Chance

Illinois Lawmakers Consider Giving 4-Time DUI Offenders Another Chance

Photo: Newsradio WTAX

State lawmakers are seriously considering letting four-time DUI offenders drive again.

A bill passed out of an Illinois House committee 15-0. State Rep. Elaine Nekritz (D-Northbrook) is the sponsor.

“A lot of these people are driving anyway, because they have to in order to be able to support themselves and their family. Let’s give them a legal way to drive rather than have them drive without insurance and without knowing that they’re on the roads, so I think that this is a good way of making our streets safer,” she said.

The licenses would be restricted in terms of times and places that holders could drive; they’d have to have waited five years after losing their license or getting out of jail, they’d have to demonstrate three years of sobriety, undergo alcohol treatment, and have a breathalyzer installed in their car.

According to secretary of state records, 380 Illinois residents lost driver’s licenses in 2013, mostly for fourth DUI convictions.

The measure now advances to the House floor.

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