News

Illinois Department of Natural Resources Seeks Maps of Old Underground Mines

Illinois Department of Natural Resources Seeks Maps of Old Underground Mines

Photo: Newsradio WTAX

State officials are seeking the public’s help to find old maps of long-closed underground coal mines.

The maps help determine whether an area is a risk of subsidence — holes or sagging that can damage homes and other buildings, like a southern Illinois school that had to be rebuilt five years ago.

But Department of Natural Resources mine experts say they only have about 2,000 maps for more than 4,000 mines that operated in the state over the past 160 years.

They want to make digital copies before they deteriorate or are destroyed, and believe many are in private hands.

Robert Gibson supervises the emergency section in the DNR’s mines and minerals department. He says two-thirds of Illinois was mined for coal, so the risk to structures is widespread.

Recent Headlines

1 hour ago in Local

Lawmakers Honor Lincoln at Lincoln’s Tomb

Fresh
2-12-16 Lincoln Tomb

Senator Dick Durbin, a Democrat, says a Republican like Abraham Lincoln is still someone for which we should place great honor.

2 hours ago in Local

Grant Encourages Better Farm Conservation

Fresh
farm

If you're a farmer in the 21st Century, you're probably hearing about - if not practicing - "precision farming." And that extends to conservation practices, too.

6 hours ago in Local

Rauner to Close Juvenile Prison

Updated
juvenile justice

Gov. Bruce Rauner's administration says it will close the youth correctional facility in Kewanee, near Peoria and the Quad Cities.

6 hours ago in Local

$1 Million Donated for Governor’s Mansion Repairs

Updated
governor's mansion

The organization leading efforts to renovation the Illinois governor's mansion says it received $1 million in donations last year toward efforts to fix a leaky roof and other things.

6 hours ago in Local

Illinois Up for Federal Transportation Money

Updated
road construction

Illinois transportation planners are awaiting details of how they could use a potential multi-million windfall for the state.