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Ill. GOP Predicts a Red U.S. Senate

Ill. GOP Predicts a Red U.S. Senate

Photo: Newsradio WTAX

If the predictions of Illinois Republicans hold true, the U.S. Senate will be painted red come next year.

Republicans would have to net six U.S. Senate seats out of the 36 being decided this fall—21 of which are currently held by Democrats. U.S. Rep. Peter Roskam (R-Wheaton) believes that’s likely to happen, and is already speculating that the first priority of a new Republican majority would be to get President Obama to rescind some of his executive orders.

“If the President can turn those things on from a regulatory point of view, he can also turn those things off,” Roskam said, “and I think that the Senate Republican majority then would be empowered to engage and you would see some of these sort of incremental changes moving forward that I think the country is really, really interested in.”

Republicans have not held a majority in the Senate since 2007, which was also the last time the party has in control of both houses of Congress.

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