News

Hospitals Stand to Lose If You Go without Insurance

Hospitals Stand to Lose If You Go without Insurance

If too many people choose to live without health insurance after the deadline for buy coverage passes this month, hospitals around the state may be hurt financially.

That’s because under the Affordable Care Act, federal reimbursement to hospitals which treat many uninsured patients will be cut. The justification is that there will be fewer people without coverage thanks to the law.

That worries hospital executives such as Mark Newton (pictured) of Chicago’s Swedish Covenant Hospital, who fears that even if enrollment in Illinois meets projections, his hospital and others may have to make cuts.

“Unless enrollment rates pick up, storied hospitals may be forced to cut back services and cut back employment levels,” Newton said.

Newton says he has long been concerned that the projected enrollment was already too low to avoid this problem.

The hospitals that would feel the effects are ones that treat a greater share of uninsured patients, usually located in poor urban or rural areas. Newton says his hospital will lose $10 million in federal funds.

 

Recent Headlines

in Local

Champaign Leads Illinois Cities in 5-Year Growth

Champaign

Decatur had drop in population.

in Local

General Assembly to Get Going on Rauner’s Bills

Illinois General Assembly

Several bills coming out of the governor's office are on Rauner's "Turnaround Agenda".

in Local

Special Election Candidate Says Raise in Gas Tax Isn’t the Way to Go

Mike Flynn

Mike Flynn says there are alternatives to raising gas tax in order to fund the Highway Trust Fund.

in Local

“Workers Comp Reform” Fails in Illinois House

illinois house

The Illinois House closed out the week with Democrats taking another whack at the governor's "Turnaround Agenda."

in Local

New University of Illinois President Visits UIS

5-22-15 timothy kileen

New University of Illinois president Timothy Killeen is reacting to published reports suggesting that community college and university presidents get some pretty expensive perks.