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Governor’s Day Rally: No Politics This Year, Either

Governor’s Day Rally: No Politics This Year, Either

Fairgoers on Governor’s Day Wednesday will have a repeat of 2013: a musical program which, intentionally or not, will deny union members and other critics a chance to boo Gov. Pat Quinn.

“If you’re governor, you’ve got to have a tough hide,” Quinn says. “I’ve been in public life quite a while and stick to my beliefs and follow my conscience, and that’s a good way to go in life.”

Quinn says gospel and country will be among the genres on the bill Wednesday on the Director’s Lawn. Those who insist on a diet of political chat and cheering can go to the annual county chairmen’s brunch Wednesday morning. U. S. Rep. Tammy Duckworth (D-Hoffman Estates) will be the keynote speaker.

The rally, typically an hour or two and featuring speeches, recorded music and cheering, was cut to about twenty minutes in 2012, as the Democrats on stage gave up.

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