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Gov Hopeful: Unemployment Benefits Disincentive to Work

Gov Hopeful: Unemployment Benefits Disincentive to Work

Photo: Associated Press/M. Spencer Green

One Republican candidate for governor believes unemployment benefits discourage Illinoisans from working.

State Sen. Bill Brady (R-Bloomington) claims the biggest problem facing businesses, particularly manufacturers, in Illinois, is how long and how much workers can collect from unemployment insurance when they’re laid off. Brady says those concerns come straight from manufacturers.

“They say, ‘They’re enjoying — I’ll use — their unemployment insurance. And I can’t get them back to work.’ So we’ve gotta motivate people to get back into the workforce,” Brady said.

According to the Illinois Department of Employment Security, the maximum weekly benefit amount is $418 before taxes. That’s the same as earning $10.45 per hour for a 40-hour work week. There are additional allowances if your spouse is also out of work or if you have dependent children. In comparison, the median hourly wage for a machinist in Illinois is $18.82 per hour, according to IDES.

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