News

FutureGen Could Equal Big Bucks, Jobs

FutureGen Could Equal Big Bucks, Jobs

Photo: Newsradio WTAX

The story of FutureGen, the carbon-capture program advertised as “clean coal,” will include local labor.

FutureGen will use a long-dormant power plant in Meredosia, a Morgan County town along the Mississippi River, to capture carbon dioxide and pipeline it thirty miles away, not quite all the way to Jacksonville, where there will be a FutureGen visitors’ and training center.

The project’s leaders and representatives of seventeen unions signed an agreement in Jacksonville Monday.

“All that progress – engineering and permitting – is a big stack of paper unless we’ve got you,” FutureGen Alliance chief executive Ken Humphreys told labor leaders. “And it doesn’t just get done by anybody; it gets done by a highly skilled workforce that knows how to work safely.”

Paul Moore of the Central Illinois Building Trades emphasized a no-strike, no-lockout provision, streamlined conflict resolution, and fixed costs.

The project, forecast to put $12 billion into the state’s economy over the next 24 years, begins construction in September.

Recent Headlines

in Local

Oil Train Derails Near Galena

railroad

A BNSF Railway freight train containing 103 cars loaded with crude oil has derailed near Galena.

in Local

Durbin Wants Expansion of Veterans Caregiver Funding

Durbin VA Caregiver

Senator Dick Durbin wants to expand a program that currently provides care to post-9/11 disabled veterans, to disabled veterans of any conflict.

in Local

Unions Sue Over Exec. Order on Fair Share Dues

Updated
rauner

Illinois labor unions are asking a judge to invalidate Gov. Bruce Rauner's executive order.

in Local

Lawmaker Wants to Revive Illinois Death Penalty

jail

Just four years after capital punishment was taken off the books in Illinois, a state lawmaker says it's time to bring it back.

in Local

Number of Illinois Children in Poverty Holds Steady

voices

The child poverty rate is holding steady in Illinois, but it's holding steady at a rate higher than advocates would like.