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Could Voters Redraw Political Maps?

Could Voters Redraw Political Maps?

Photo: Newsradio WTAX

The campaign to change the way Illinois’ political maps are drawn claims to have enough signatures to put a constitutional amendment on the ballot.

The Yes of Independent Maps campaign says it has 346,759 signatures, which is more than the 297,000 that are needed. But campaign manager Michael Kolenc says they are not finished.

“There’s always the possibility of bad signatures or duplicate signatures, so the campaign has said all along that we’re aiming closer to 450,000 or above,” he said.

The deadline for submitting petitions is May 4. Kolenc says the campaign plans to finish canvassing in the middle of April.

They’re advocating a process for drawing the districts for the state legislature that does not involve politicians, but rather people who are outside the political process and who are mostly non-partisan. If they indeed have the signatures and overcome objections, the measure would go before voters in November.

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