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Community College Completion Rates Increasing

Community College Completion Rates Increasing

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Community colleges say they’re on their way to meeting goals for getting more Illinois residents to finish school.

In 2009, the state called on colleges to help more people between the ages of 25 and 64 get a college degree or certificate.

“That report set the goal of increasing the proportion of working-age adults with meaningful degrees and certificates from 41 percent to 60 percent by 2025,” said Christine Sobek, president of Waubonsee Community College in Sugar Grove. “According to the Illinois Community College Board, we are on track to meet those goals.”

Sobek says in that time period, the number of graduates at community colleges has increased by more than 30 percent, which she credits to the lower tuition offered by two-year schools compared to the state’s public and private universities.

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