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Bill Would Outlaw “Revenge Porn”

Bill Would Outlaw “Revenge Porn”

Do you know what revenge porn is?

This is when an ex-spouse or ex-boyfriend or ex-girlfriend finds a sexually explicit photo or video of his or her former partner, and posts it on the internet for all to find and see.

State Sen. Michael E. Hastings (D-Orland Hills) is sponsoring a bill to make this illegal in Illinois. “It would make it a felony to post sexually explicit videos or photos of a person without their consent to an internet site. And if it passed, it would also make it illegal to host a website that requires victims to pay a fee to have explicit videos and photos removed,” he said.

Hastings isn’t sure how big a problem this is, though he says it is growing and it is a type of cyber-bullying that should be stopped. He says it is embarrassing, and potentially harmful if, say, a prospective employer runs an applicant’s name through Google and comes up with the “revenge porn.”

In Illinois, it is illegal to post identifying information of a minor, or an adult without consent, on a pornographic site, but there is no law to prevent individuals from posting sexually explicit content of an adult, without consent, to a website that is not strictly a porn site.

New Jersey and California have enacted laws criminalizing revenge porn.

 

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