News

A Republican Governor Would Live in Springfield

A Republican Governor Would Live in Springfield

All four Republican candidates for governor are pledging to live and work in Springfield.

State Sen. Bill Brady (R-Bloomington) says by promising to move to the state’s capital, he’s fulfilling an obligation of the governorship, not encouraging any Downstate resentment towards the Chicago area.

“If you’re going to apply for a job, and the job is in Springfield, Ill., then you need to live and work in Springfield, Ill.,” Brady said. “That’s not playing up a rivalry, that’s just a fact.”

The state’s last two governors, Rod Blagojevich and Gov. Pat Quinn, have worked mostly in Chicago.

State Treasurer Dan Rutherford also pledges to move to the capital, but says there has to be a balance between the rest of the state and Chicago.

“I’m going to be fair about it,” Rutherford said. “Yes, my residence will be the mansion in Springfield, and I’m going to use that facility to help make Illinois a better place. I’m going to be in the office in Chicago, but I’m not going to have it be a Chicago-centrist government.”

 

 

Recent Headlines

in Local

Reid Suggests Schumer, Not Durbin, Should Succeed Him

Fresh
dickdurbin2

U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin is praising Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid as "one of the ablest leaders of the Senate Democratic caucus in modern history.''

in Local

Kirk, Durbin Back Changes to Disaster Declaration Process

Fresh
capitol

The measure has been introduced twice previously without success.

in Local

Mayoral Candidates Debate on WTAX — And Ask Each Other Questions

3-26-15 Mayoral Debate

Minimum wage, right to work zones, and other questions were posed.

in Local

Springfield Opens New Park

3-26-15 Playground

Children wasted no time Thursday morning running to play in the new "Bounties of Nature" playground at Center Park in Springfield, once it officially opened.

in Local

Legislature Passes Budget Fix, Governor Says He’ll Sign

money pile

The Illinois Legislature has approved a plan ending weeks of negotiations over plugging a $1.6 billion hole in this year's state budget.