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Willard Scott of ‘Today Show’ marries at 80

Willard Scott of ‘Today Show’ marries at 80

MARRIED:Scott and Paris Keena were married in Fort Myers, Florida, on Monday, according to Today.com, which posted a picture of the smiling couple. Photo: Associated Press

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Television personality Willard Scott, a former weatherman who has been with NBC’s “Today” morning news show for more than 30 years, has wed his longtime girlfriend at the age of 80.

Scott and Paris Keena were married in Fort Myers, Florida, on Monday, according to Today.com, which posted a picture of the smiling couple.

A former disc jockey and weatherman in Washington, D.C., Scott is known for his happy birthday wishes for centenarians on the “Today” show. His first wife, Mary, died in 2002.

Scott and Keena first met in 1977. They had been together for about 11 years before tying the knot.

When asked about a honeymoon, Keena told the website: “Our whole life has been a honeymoon.”

(Reporting by Patricia Reaney; Editing by Lisa Von Ahn)

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