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WATCH: How to perfectly carve a Thanksgiving turkey

WATCH: How to perfectly carve a Thanksgiving turkey

Photo: YouTube

One minute of your time and you’ll be able to impress your Thanksgiving Day dinner guests.

Carving the Breast

1. First, allow your cooked turkey to sit for about 20 minutes before starting to carve.
2. Beginning halfway up the breast, slice straight down with an even stroke.
3. When the knife reaches the cut above the wing joint, the slice should fall free on its own.
4. Continue to slice breast meat by starting the cut at a higher point each time.

Carving the Drumsticks

1. Cut the band of skin holding the drumsticks.
2. Grasp the end of the drumstick, place your knife between the drumstick/thigh and the body of the turkey, and cut through the skin to the joint.
3. Remove the entire leg by pulling out and back, using the point of the knife to disjoin it.
4. Separate the thigh and drumstick at the joint.

Carving the Wings

1. Insert a fork in the upper wing to the steady turkey.
2. Make a long horizontal cut above the wing joint through the body frame.
3. The wing can be disjointed from the body, if desired.

Courtesy of Butterball Turkey. For more carving help, call the Butterball Turkey Talk line at 1-800-288-8372.

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