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Syracuse University ranks as No. 1 party school

Syracuse University ranks as No. 1 party school

PARTY TIME: Syracuse Orange fans during their game against the Pittsburgh Panthers at the Carrier Dome in Syracuse, N.Y., Saturday, Nov. 23. Syracuse was named America's top "party school" on Monday. Photo: Associated Press/Heather Ainsworth

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — Syracuse University knows how to party.

The Orange are at the top of the annual list of the nation’s top party schools released Monday by The Princeton Review.

Last year’s winner, the University of Iowa, is second. Rounding out the top 5 are: the University of California-Santa Barbara, West Virginia University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Repeating at the top of “stone-cold sober schools” was Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah.

Syracuse says in a statement that it doesn’t “aspire to be a party school.” It says it has an internationally recognized reputation for academic excellence.

About 130,000 students on 379 campuses were surveyed for the book, which contains 62 top-20 lists ranking factors like financial aid awards, athletic facilities and food.

The publication is not affiliated with Princeton University.

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