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Sophia, Noah are America’s most popular baby names

Sophia, Noah are America’s most popular baby names

BABY NAMES: A girl plays in front of the skyline of New York's Lower Manhattan and One World Trade Center in a park along the Hudson River in Hoboken, New Jersey. Photo: Reuters/Gary Hershorn

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Noah and Sophia top this year’s list of the most common baby names in the United States, the U.S. Social Security Administration said on Friday.

Last year, 21,075 baby girls were named Sophia and 18,090 baby boys were named Noah. Emma and Olivia trailed close behind for most popular girls names, while Liam and Jacob took up the respective second and third spots among boys.

Jacob has long dominated the boys’ name category, ranking as the most popular every year from 1999 to 2012. It slipped to third in 2013. Last year marked the first time that neither Michael nor Jacob took the top spot since 1960.

Sophia has been the most popular girls name since 2011, with the top spot last held by Isabella in 2010.

The data comes from some 4 million social security card applications across the United States up through February 2014, the agency said. Data is limited to U.S. births where birth year, sex, and birth state are known and for babies with names longer than two characters.

Over the past century, Michael has been the most popular boys name, ranking first 44 times, and Mary has been the most common girl’s name, with 42 first place finishes.

The agency began publishing the baby names listing in 1998 and releases the rankings shortly before Mother’s Day every year.

(Reporting by Curtis Skinner; editing by Andrew Hay)

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