Pro sports becoming more open to paternity leave

Pro sports becoming more open to paternity leave

PATERNITY LEAVE:New York Mets Daniel Murphy (28) at bat in the ninth inning of the baseball game against the Atlanta Braves Wednesday, April 9, in Atlanta. The Braves won the game 4-3. Photo: Associated Press/Todd Kirkland


When New York Mets second baseman Daniel Murphy was criticized on talk radio for spending three days with his family after the birth of his son, teammates, coaches and opponents leapt to his defense.

The four major pro sports leagues in North America are becoming increasingly open to paternity leave as more players express a desire to be with their families when a baby arrives.

Major League Baseball is the only league with a standardized policy written into its rulebook. But the NFL, NBA and NHL have all shown willingness to give their players some time when that day comes.

Players say that kind of compassion is a welcome change from decades ago, when athletes often missed one of life’s biggest moments to stay with their teams.

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