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Philip Seymour Hoffman died of mix of drugs

Philip Seymour Hoffman died of mix of drugs

PHILIP SEYMOUR HOFFMAN: The actor died of a combination of illegal drugs. Photo: Associated Press

(NEW YORK) – The New York City coroner on Friday announced the results of the autopsy performed on late actor Philip Seymour Hoffman.

The 46-year-old died on Feb. 2. His official cause of death was acute drug intoxication, including heroin, cocaine, benzodiazepines and amphetamine, according to Julie Bolcer, spokeswoman for the Medical Examiner’s Office.

It has been ruled an accidental overdose.

Hoffman was found dead in his apartment with a syringe in his arm. He had previously battled drug addition but had been clean for more than two decades.

PHOTOS: 2014 Notable Deaths | WATCH: Essential Philip Seymour Hoffman films

Hoffman, an Academy Award winner for his role in the 2005 biographical film “Capote,” was considered one of the most gifted stage and film actors of his generation.

On the big screen Hoffman appeared in blockbusters such as “The Hunger Games” series and also garnered best supporting actor Oscar nominations for “The Master,” “Doubt” and “Charlie Wilson’s War.”

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