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Ohioans have potty mouths; Washingtonians don’t

Ohioans have potty mouths; Washingtonians don’t

WATCH YOUR MOUTH: Some states just can't keep it "clean." Photo: clipart.com

Ohio ranks as the most profane state, with the majority of its phone calls involving the use of some type of profanity, according to a study by digital advertising firm Marchex.

The study, originally released in May, has garnered new attention thanks to making the rounds on social media and sites like Buzzfeed.

Marchex analyzed more than 600,000 phone calls from around the country to compile its list of who cusses and who is most likely to say “please” and “thank you.”

Ohioans curse more than twice the rate of Washingtonians, according to the data. Washingtonians curse about every 300 conversations. Ohioans, on the other hand, swore about every 150 conversations, according to Marchex.

Maryland, New Jersey, Louisiana and Illinois round out the top-five most potty-mouthed states, while residents of Washington, Massachusetts and Arizona were found to be among America’s least likely to use curse words.

The study also found that North Carolina and South Carolina were among the top two states most likely to use pleasantries such as “please” and “thank you.”

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