News

Obama: Insufficient data to fast-track Ebola drug

Obama: Insufficient data to fast-track Ebola drug

EBOLA OUTBREAK: U.S. President Barack Obama delivers remarks at the first Leaders Session of the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit at the State Department in Washington, Aug. 6. Photo: Reuters/Larry Downing

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Barack Obama said on Wednesday he lacks enough information to green-light a promising drug to treat the deadly Ebola virus and that the initial response should focus on public health measures to contain the outbreak.

“We’ve got to let the science guide us and I don’t think all the information is in on whether this drug is helpful,” the president said at a media conference. “The Ebola virus both currently and in the past is controllable if you have a strong public health infrastructure in place.”

Public health officials should do all they can to contain the outbreak, and during the course of that process, authorities can assess whether new drugs or treatments can be effective, he said.

“We’re focusing on the public health approach right now, but I will continue to seek information about what we’re learning about these drugs going forward,” he said.

(Reporting By Mark Felsenthal; Editing by Sandra Maler)

Recent Headlines

in Local

City Council Green Lights Magro’s off Stevenson Dr.

municipalcenter

Aldermen approved the variance on a 9-1 vote, Ward 3 Alderman Doris Turner was the lone no vote.

in Local

Eastbound Monroe St. Reduced by Capitol

road construction

Public Works says multiple service valves have broken and they need to be repaired.

in Local

Portions of Chatham Under Boil Order

water

Residents and businesses in the area on West Walnut St. from Route 4 to College might experience low water pressure or no water pressure at all.

in Election 2014, Local

Barr, Regan Agree to Sheriff’s Race Debate on WTAX Oct. 31

sangamon county sheriff

The two candidates have sparred back and forth in recent weeks through press releases and, in some cases, have cancelled other debates due to perceived hostilities.