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LeBron James getting a sitcom

LeBron James getting a sitcom

FROM BASKETBALL TO TV: Miami Heat's LeBron James (6) shoots against New York Knicks' Tim Hardaway Jr. (5) and J.R. Smith during the second half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Feb. 1, in New York. Miami won 106-91. The basketball star is moving forward with a sitcom loosely based on his life. Photo: Associated Press/Jason DeCrow

A new TV sitcom produced by basketball star LeBron James and “Glee” actor Mike O’Malley has been given the green light by bosses at Starz network.

The Miami Heat forward, along with his longtime friend and business partner Maverick Carter, “The Cosby Show” producer Tom Werner, and O’Malley will serve as executive producers on the project, titled “Survivor’s Remorse.”

O’Malley, who has previously written for the TV series Shameless, will also pen the script.

The half-hour comedy is loosely based on James’ own rise to fame, as it follows the lives of two friends, one of whom is a basketball star, and how their relationships with friends and family change with their success.

The series has been picked up for six episodes and will debut next autumn, according to Deadline.com.

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