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Johnny Depp takes on music of Bob Dylan

Johnny Depp takes on music of Bob Dylan

JOHNNY DEPP: Rock movie star to rock star. Photo: Associated Press

Actor Johnny Depp is set to show off his musical talents on a new record based on unfinished Bob Dylan songs.

The “Alice in Wonderland” star visited the Los Angeles’ Capitol Studios to watch the recording session for producer T Bone Burnett’s “Lost On The River: The New Basement Tapes,” but ended up filling in for Elvis Costello on the guitar for the song “Kansas City.”

“Lost On The River: The New Basement Tapes,” which also features Marcus Mumford of Mumford & Sons and Jim James of My Morning Jacket, is set for release this autumn to coincide with a new documentary called “Lost Songs: The Basement Tapes Continued,” directed by Sam Jones.

The lyrics come from Dylan’s 1967 “Basement Tapes” sessions.

This isn’t the first musical venture for the Depp – the actor is currently working with The Beatles legend Paul McCartney on a secret project with Alice Cooper and Joe Perry, while he has also become a familiar sight at Aerosmith and Willie Nelson concerts after joining them onstage on various occasions.

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