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Johnny Cash’s former home sells for $2M

Johnny Cash’s former home sells for $2M

JOHNNY CASH:The seven-bedroom home was built in 1968. Johnny Cash and June Carter-Cash called the place home for four decades. Photo: Associated Press

A sprawling home in Henderson, Tennessee which once belonged to late music legend Johnny Cash has been sold for $2 million.

The mansion, which the country music star and his wife June Carter Cash called home for more than 40 years, is off the market after bosses at limited liability company Lakehouse Holdings purchased the property.

The estate was sold by Bee Gees star Barry Gibb and his wife Linda, who bought the house in 2005, promising to preserve the Cash legacy. They also hoped the setting would serve as an inspiration in their own music.

The Gibbs, whose main residence is in Miami, Florida, were planning to completely renovate and restore the lake-front house in 2005, but a fire in 2007 destroyed much of the mostly wooden structure.

The seven-bedroom home was built in 1968, and served as a setting in 2005 Cash biopic “Walk the Line,” starring Joaquin Phoenix and Reese Witherspoon.

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