News

‘Hello Kitty’ video pulled from YouTube amid racism allegations

‘Hello Kitty’ video pulled from YouTube amid racism allegations

'HELLO KITTY:' YouTube bosses did not take down Hello Kitty, but confirmed to MTV News the promo is not currently available for public viewing. Photo: Associated Press

Avril Lavigne’s new Japanese-themed music video for her song “Hello Kitty” has disappeared from YouTube.com, hours after the pop star came under fire amid allegations the promo features racist stereotypes.

The “Sk8er Boi” hitmaker released the video, in which she prances around on a rooftop, in a candy store and in a sushi bar as four expressionless Asian girls pose as her backing dancers, online on Tuesday, but the playful promo, which exaggerates Japan’s kawaii (cute) culture, didn’t sit well with some fans.

It sparked a backlash and many devotees took to Twitter.com to express their outrage, turning the hashtag #avrilracist into a trending topic.

One user wrote, “Not sure if this Avril Lavigne video is terrible, racist, or terribly racist”, while another tweeted, “Oh Avril, this is literally the worst music I have ever heard. And then you had to go and make it kinda racist. Why.”

Lavigne has yet to comment on the controversy, but the promo has since been removed from YouTube.com.

A representative for the video-sharing website has revealed that YouTube bosses did not take down Hello Kitty, but confirmed to MTV News the promo is not currently available for public viewing.

The video is still available on Lavigne’s website.

Recent Headlines

5 hours ago in Local

UPDATE: Budget Plan Passes Amid GOP Outrage

Updated
Generic WTAX

$7B unbalanced; $700M bump for schools

9 hours ago in Local

Bomb Threat Unfounded at Butler Elementary School

Butler Elementary School

Butler Elementary School is back to normal after a bomb threat caused it to be evacuated for a short time Wednesday.

9 hours ago in Local

AP NewsBreak: Rauner Board Asked Builders to Lobby Lawmakers

Illinois Republican gubernatorial candidate businessman Bruce Rauner participates in a Republican gubernatorial candidate debate Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014, in Springfield, Ill. The four Republican gubernatorial candidates said that they’ll be willing to work with unions if elected but differed on how to approach the relationship during a downstate debate that largely focused on pension reform, taxes and just briefly on personal issues that have dogged some of the candidates.

Good-government advocates are criticizing the head of an agency managing state construction projects for asking builders to lobby lawmakers to restore funding.

10 hours ago in Local

House Fails to Override Labor Arbitration Veto

5-18-16 Rally 1

The labor arbitration bill remains dead.

10 hours ago in Local

Another Leaders Meeting, Optimism Dissolving

capitol_north

The last days of session are a flurry of activity, if not progress.