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‘Guardians of the Galaxy’ sequel set for 2017

‘Guardians of the Galaxy’ sequel set for 2017

Chris Pratt stars a Peter Quill in Marvel's "Guardians of the Galaxy."/Image.net

Marvel executives have unveiled plans to press ahead with a sequel to “Guardians of the Galaxy,”┬ádays before the superhero movie even hits cinemas.

Director James Gunn and actor Chris Pratt, who stars as lead character Star Lord, shared the news with fans on Saturday as they attended the Marvel Studios’ Comic-Con presentation in San Diego, California.

The announcement comes shortly before the first installment of Guardians of the Galaxy opens across the world next week.

The follow-up film is scheduled for release on 28 July, 2017.

Pratt, who had to bulk up for the role, recently told the New York Post he would jump at the chance to reprise his part as Peter Quill, a mercenary who has to team up with a group of misfits to secure his freedom and save the world after stealing a mysterious orb.

He said, “I’d be thrilled to do (a sequel). I’m just going to sit back and eat chicken and do bench presses and wait by the phone.”

The movie also co-stars Zoe Saldana, Vin Diesel and Bradley Cooper.

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