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First lady set to respond to school meal critics

First lady set to respond to school meal critics

WHAT'S FOR LUNCH?:A school lunch salad entree option featuring low-sodium chicken, a whole-grain roll, fresh red peppers, and cilantro dressing is assembled in a lunch basket at Mirror Lake Elementary School in Federal Way, Wash., south of Seattle, Monday, May 5. On this day, students could choose between this salad and a more traditional lunch of a grilled cheese sandwich on whole grain bread served with a southwestern-style corn salad, fresh carrots and either canned pears or apple sauce. Photo: Associated Press/Ted S. Warren

MARY CLARE JALONICK, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — First lady Michelle Obama is answering Republicans in Congress who want to roll back healthier school meal standards. She is holding an event at the White House to highlight the success of the guidelines.

The Tuesday event is an unusual move for the first lady, who has largely stayed away from policy fights since she lobbied for congressional passage of a child nutrition law in 2010.

The director of Mrs. Obama’s Let’s Move initiative to combat childhood obesity said a Republican bill that would allow schools to opt out of the standards is “a real assault” on administration efforts to make foods healthier for kids.

Sam Kass said the event will highlight successes of schools that have implemented the standards, set by the Obama administration and Congress.

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