News

Fake signs campaign for anyone but Rob Ford

Fake signs campaign for anyone but Rob Ford

FORD NATION:Toronto Mayor Rob Ford sits in the council chamber as councillors look to pass motions to limit his powers on Monday Nov. 18. Photo: Associated Press/THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

With offers of “just smoking pot” and the ability to never get caught urinating in public, it’d be hard to believe that the fictional campaign signs for the Toronto mayor’s race are real. But, they are getting a lot of attention.

The signs, a project of the website NoFordNation.com, appeared Monday in Toronto’s Trinity Bellwoods Park, according to Canada.com.

Ford Nation is the nickname of the campaign and general persona of the 44-year-old mayor who has admittedly smoked crack-cocaine and had a series of very public gaffes.

The No Ford Nation website and Facebook page offer information on the other candidates running for Toronto’s top job, as well a cartoon series of some of Ford’s more memorable – err, embarrassing – moments as mayor.

Recent Headlines

in Local

Manar, Tumulty Formally Support Hawkins

3-30-15 Rianne Hawkins Andy Manar Cecilia Tumulty

A former mayor and county and village official is backing a Springfield woman's bid to take the top job in the Springfield City Clerk's office in next week's election.

in Local

Congressman: Don’t Trust Obama Admin or Iran

rodney davis

Iran's possible reversal of a promise to ship out its atomic fuel is more proof that the Obama administration and its foreign policy are failures.

in Local

Duckworth Announces Senate Run

Tammy Duckworth

An Illinois Congresswoman is the first to say she wants Mark Kirk's seat in the U.S. Senate.

in Local

Anti-Vehicle Theft Money Cut from Budget

handcuffs2

Groups that help fund the prevention of motor vehicle thefts in Illinios are among those that are sounding the alarm on some of Governor Bruce Rauner's budget cuts.

in Local

Lawmakers Consider Requiring Paid Sick Days

sick

The choice of going to work sick or staying home and not getting paid would no longer be the choice – under a bill discussed in an Illinois Senate committee.