News

FAA changes rules; cell phones, tablets cleared for takeoff

FAA changes rules; cell phones, tablets cleared for takeoff

CLEARED FOR TAKEOFF: A United Airlines jet departs in view of the air traffic control tower at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. The FAA has loosened rules allowing passengers to use electronic devices in flight. Photo: Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Government safety rules are changing to let airline passengers use most electronic devices from gate-to-gate.

The change will let passengers read, work, play games, watch movies and listen to music.

The Federal Aviation Administration says airlines can allow passengers to use the devices during takeoffs and landings on planes that meet certain criteria for protecting aircraft systems from electronic interference.

Most new airliners are expected to meet the criteria, but changes won’t happen immediately. Timing will depend upon the airline.

Connections to the Internet to surf, exchange emails, text or download data will still be prohibited below 10,000 feet.

Heavier devices like laptops will have to be stowed. Passengers will be told to switch their smartphones, tablets and other devices to airplane mode.

And cellphone calls will still be prohibited.

Recent Headlines

in Local

Durbin: Override Heroin Veto

Fresh
durbin

Calls Rauner's veto "thoughtless"

in Local

More Voters Than Citizens

Fresh
voter

Illinois #3 in nation; Sangamon County is one of the offenders

in Local

Survey: Teachers Still Spend Plenty of Money Out of Pocket

8-31-15 Horace Mann Survey

A new study by Horace Mann insurance suggests teachers spend a lot of their own money on supplies for their classrooms.

in Local

UIS-Led Survey Examines Issues for Transgendered People

UIS logo

A national survey conducted by the University of Illinois-Springfield shows positive attitudes towards the rights of transgendered people.

in Local

Lawmaker: Cut Tax Breaks, Close DCEO

jack franks

State Rep. Jack Franks will propose closing tax loopholes and eliminating what he considers to be unfair credits for businesses.