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Christmastime comes with superstitions, tall tales

Christmastime comes with superstitions, tall tales

TRADITIONS, TALL TALES: Christmas has long held superstitions. Photo: clipart.com

Christmas has long been a time ripe for superstitions, tall tales and odd beliefs.

Some experts say that since Christmas has a strong religious base, it’s been a prime target for various superstitions over the years. Others suggest it’s simply a matter of local customs taking shape through time.

Regardless, there are quite a few superstitions that have been observed around the holiday.

For instance, an old Scottish tale suggests that babies born on Christmas can see spirits, and possibly even command them.

In France, it’s been believed that Christmas babies have the gift of prophecy.

In old England, mothers would take their sick children to the door on Christmas night, in the belief the Virgin Mary would pass by with the Christ child.

Some Spaniards used to believe that you should treat cows kindly on Christmas, since cattle are thought to have been present when Jesus was born.

And according to one superstition, any dog that howled on Christmas Day was sure to go mad in the coming year.

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