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At Oscars, Meryl Streep bigger than God

At Oscars, Meryl Streep bigger than God

THANKS, MERYL: Best actress Meryl Streep, left, for "The Iron Lady" and best actor Jean Dujardin for "The Artist" pose with their awards during the 84th Academy Awards on Sunday, Feb. 26, 2012, in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles. Photo: Associated Press/Joel Ryan

In more than 10 years of Oscar acceptance speeches, the Academy Award-winning actress has been thanked more than anyone – even the Almighty.

According to Slate.com, Oscar acceptance speeches range the gamut from short and sweet (Morgan Freeman gave a 32-second thank you) to long speeches filled with all-out gushing.

The one constant during the last 12 years of speeches analyzed by Slate? God was thanked a lot – but the big man upstairs came in second to Hollywood icon Meryl Streep. Streep, 4 – God, 3.

Other big name celebs thanked more than once by Oscar acceptors included Oprah Winfrey and Sidney Poitier. And then there’s the actor’s family and blah blah blah.

 

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