A-Rod back at MLB for grievance hearing

A-Rod back at MLB for grievance hearing

A-ROD APPEALS: The New York Yankee player wants his 211-game suspension overturned. Photo: Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — Alex Rodriguez is back at Major League Baseball’s office for the resumption of the grievance hearing to overturn his 211-game suspension.

Arbitrator Fredric Horowitz already has presided over eight days of sessions, from Sept. 30-Oct. 3 and from Oct. 15-18.

Rodriguez’s legal team was set to call witnesses when the hearing resumed.

It was unclear whether the New York Yankees third baseman would testify. He had been scheduled for an investigatory interview with MLB on Friday, but the session was canceled when Rodriguez’s side said he was ill with flu-like systems and could not travel from California.

Rodriguez was suspended for 211 games by MLB on Aug. 5 for alleged violations of the sport’s drug agreement and labor contract, and the players’ association filed a grievance to overturn the penalty.

Recent Headlines

in Local

Springfield Jobless Rate Drops — And More

job apps

Springfield-area Unemployment: 5.1%

in Local

Rauner Issues Pardons

Illinois Republican gubernatorial candidate businessman Bruce Rauner participates in a Republican gubernatorial candidate debate Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014, in Springfield, Ill. The four Republican gubernatorial candidates said that they’ll be willing to work with unions if elected but differed on how to approach the relationship during a downstate debate that largely focused on pension reform, taxes and just briefly on personal issues that have dogged some of the candidates.

Rauner granted 10 and denied 200 clemency petitions.

in Local

Springfield Man Convicted of Sexual Assault


Christopher Westfall was convicted in August.

in Local

Food Pantries Thankful for Contributions

Food Pantries

Donations at Illinois food pantries during the holiday season helps them stay open year round.

in Local

Businesses Get EDGE Tax Credits


The deals through the EDGE tax-credit program, though, would not provide tax incentives until Rauner and Illinois lawmakers agree on the overdue state budget.